How to make desert bases

In the previous post we discussed one way to paint true metallic metal gold using as an example model a unit of LOTR Easterling (28mm, Games-Workshop). Now, we will see how to finish these miniatures by making desert bases. According to my experience, one of the most difficult aspects of this hobby for newcomers (and also for veterans!) is how to make the bases. Probably one reason for this is that bases are not painted, but created. That is, we need to generate a texture and add 3D elements such as rocks, plants, debris, etc. Luckily, the market is full…

True Metallic Metal (TMM): gold

I previously wrote a short tutorial describing how to paint TMM steel (you can read it here). And it was about time to write a similar post about how to paint TMM gold, taking advantage of a bunch of Easterling warriors (Games-Workshop, 28mm) I am painting right now. I am also expanding the tutorial to explain how to paint the red and marine blue clothes. The bases are unfinished, but I am planning to prepare another tutorial explaining this part. I would like to clarify that this is my own interpretation of this technique, meaning that is not the only…

Improving a 15mm paint job

Most popular painting techniques for wargames fall in the category of fast painting methods that aim for the so-called “tabletop quality”. The idea is to have ready a unit or an army as soon as possible, with each miniature painted with the right colors and a bit of contrast between shades and highlights. These quick methods are perfect for wargamers since they do not require much time, allowing the players to spend more time in the battlefield. But, sometimes we have some extra time that we can use to push forward the quality of our miniatures for wargames. I would…

Winter camouflage using a washable paint

  I recently published another post describing the “hairspray technique“, which is commonly used to create a “washable” white camouflage in scale models. During the WWII, this camo was done with a special type of white paint with little grip, so that it was easily removed with water during the thaw, causing effects of wear due to rain and rubbing of crew. However, we can create this type of camouflage following an easier approach with an specific acrylic product: Washable White Camo A.MIG 0024. We only need to apply a single layer and then activate it with water, skipping the…

New book: How to Paint Miniatures for Wargames

A few years back I published a painting book featuring how to paint wargames tanks and edited by AMMO. I had the intention to write a second volume about painting infantry for wargames, but it was postponed because I was very busy doing my PhD. Now, eight years later, the second volume has been finally released again thanks to the support of the AMMO team: How to paint miniatures for Wargames. I was not alone in this project. I had the great opportunity to collaborate with some of the wargames painters I admire the most, including the amazing historical painters…

Camouflages with Chipping Effects fluid (hairspray technique)

This article was published original on 4th of September of 2012. Updated on 4 of April of 2022. In this post we are going to see how to use a Chipping Effects fluid to create worn camouflages where the original base color is exposed. Basically, after painting the base color of the tank, the idea is to apply a thin layer of chipping fluid and on top of this the camouflage.  After activating the chipping fluid with water, we will be able to remove small pieces of the camouflage paint applied on top. These Chipping Effects fluids replaces what classically is…

How to make realistic rust effects

Some weathering effects are created rather than painted. This applies to any textured effect, such as mud, snow or rust, among others. Of course, we can try to simulate these by painting them. But it is easier -and more realistic when painting a 3D model- when we create them. In this tutorial I will explore the new corrosion creator set by AMMO, U-Rust, designed to create textured rust effects. I think that this kit was initially meant for dioramas and big scale models, but as a wargamer I was curious to see whether we could also use it to paint small…

How to paint hard edge camouflage with masking putty

This post was originally published on 12th of February of 2011. And it was updated on 30th of January of 2022 (after reading this I feel very old…). In this article we are going to see how to create a hard edge camouflage (a camo with solid edges rather than blurred) using a very simple tool for masking: removable adhesive putty. The masking will cover part of the tank, so that we can paint the remaining uncovered areas with another color in a very defined way. For example, the camo spots. We can use any mounting putties sold everywhere such…

How to apply decals correctly

I continue updating old post in my blog. This time we will discuss how to apply decals on our scale models. Originally published on 16th of August of 2010. Updated on 21st of January of 2022. Decals are a very useful, quick and easy option to add the national and tactic symbols to our scale models and tiny miniatures. However, sometimes the result is spoiled for different reasons: inappropriate adaptation of the decal on irregular surfaces, an unrealistic glossy effect, or even worst, the transparent areas of the decal become greyish (this is called icing). In this article will learn how to avoid these…

Fast painting: Warhammer 40k Blood Pact cultist

In the following article I would like to describe a few options to speed up the painting process of our miniatures for Wargames. The idea underlying fast painting techniques is to use simple and rapid methods to accelerate the work, meaning that we will sacrifice part of the quality. But this does not meant that fast painting techniques are equivalent to paint bad. We will still pay attention to the details, but will focus more on the general looking of the miniature, and more importantly, of the unit or army (after all fast painting techniques evolved to paint a large…